Keisha. 20. Asexual. Knitter. 3am Writer. Gamer. All Round Fandom Junkie.

Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from yourhazelgrace  40,865 notes

gohomeluhan:

As I’m walking through Target with my little sister, the kid somehow manages to convince me to take a trip down the doll aisle. I know the type - brands that preach diversity through displays of nine different variations of white and maybe a black girl if you’re lucky enough. What I instead found as soon as I turned into the aisle were these two boxes.

The girl on the left is Shola, an Afghani girl from Kabul with war-torn eyes. Her biography on the inside flap tells us that “her country has been at war since before she was born”, and all she has left of her family is her older sister. They’re part of a circus, the one source of light in their lives, and they read the Qur’an. She wears a hijab.

The girl on the right is Nahji, a ten-year-old Indian girl from Assam, where “young girls are forced to work and get married at a very early age”. Nahji is smart, admirable, extremely studious. She teaches her fellow girls to believe in themselves. In the left side of her nose, as tradition mandates, she has a piercing. On her right hand is a henna tattoo.

As a Pakistani girl growing up in post-9/11 America, this is so important to me. The closest thing we had to these back in my day were “customizable” American Girl dolls, who were very strictly white or black. My eyes are green, my hair was black, and my skin is brown, and I couldn’t find my reflection in any of those girls. Yet I settled, just like I settled for the terrorist jokes boys would throw at me, like I settled for the butchered pronunciations of names of mine and my friends’ countries. I settled for a white doll, who at least had my eyes if nothing else, and I named her Rabeea and loved her. But I still couldn’t completely connect to her.

My little sister, who had been the one to push me down the aisle in the first place, stopped to stare with me at the girls. And then the words, “Maybe they can be my American Girls,” slipped out of her mouth. This young girl, barely represented in today’s society, finally found a doll that looks like her, that wears the weird headscarf that her grandma does and still manages to look beautiful.

I turned the dolls’ boxes around and snapped a picture of the back of Nahji’s. There are more that I didn’t see in the store; a Belarusian, an Ethiopian, a Brazilian, a Laotian, a Native American, a Mexican. And more.

These are Hearts 4 Hearts dolls, and while they haven’t yet reached all parts of the world (I think they have yet to come out with an East Asian girl), they need all the support they can get so we can have a beautiful doll for every beautiful young girl, so we can give them what our generation never had.

Please don’t let this die. If you know a young girl, get her one. I know I’m buying Shola and Nahji for my little sister’s next birthday, because she needs a doll with beautiful brown skin like hers, a doll who wears a hijab like our older sister, a doll who wears real henna, not the blue shit white girls get at the beach.

The Hearts 4 Hearts girls are so important. Don’t overlook them. Don’t underestimate them. These can be the future if we let them.

You can read more about the dolls here: http://www.playmatestoys.com/brands/hearts-for-hearts-girls

Reblogged from simsgonewrong  2,004 notes
simsgonewrong:

woohoo-juice-simoleons:

loobyloucreations:

loobyloucreations:

What Difference a chair would make.
Hi all, i am not the best of writers but i wanted to let you know a little bit more about how the campaign and money raising, would help and change my life. 
So in the picture is a picture of the type of chair i would like once the funds have been raised, this chair will be able to be used in my home and also out and about. This chair is also perfect as everything is also customisable so will be built specifically to my needs. This will be measured to my perfect fit and with customisation it also means if i am having a really bad with weakness in my arms then i can have dual controls so my husband will be able to use the gear stick to make the chair move too.
With this chair it would open up so many possibilities to me, things i took for granted before i became disabled.
The main thing would be that i would not have bruises all over my legs from the chair, currently now when i go out in my chair i have even a 10 minute outing leaves the sides of my thighs covered in black and blue bruises. 
I would be able to do longer outings such as go to look at shops in the town centre, go on day trips when invited by my parents something i currently have to say no too. I love visiting stately homes, going to places such as Matlock and Bakewell, day trips to the sea side. I would even be able to go out to the local park to feed the squirrels and ducks, be able to take a trip to the library.
The independence it would bring would allow me to be involved with things again, without having to have people being worried to rush if i am in pain, or leaving early because things are too painful for me.
All the little things gathered mean so much to me and would make such a huge impact on my life.
I want to thank everyone that has made a creation for the campaign, has re-blogged it, has made a donation, who has contacted me and you are all amazing and i am making some amazing friends along the way too 
Thank you 
<3 Hayley
If you would like to help by either sharing the campaign on facebook, or know someone who may want to make a donation please check newwheelchairforhayley

Thank you to all who have helped with my campaign, you are all truly amazing and thank you for sending me messages, it all means so much to me :) 
We went over £1600 this weekend and that is amazing, thank you all for your help :) 
There is still a way to go but i am having a great time with all this, you are making this such a positive experience 

OMG over 1600? Do you guys know how amazing this is! I’m so proud of this community. I should make something for y’all <3 Congrats, Hayley, we are that much closer to your new wheel chair.

READ THIS, REBLOG THIS, DONATE. DONATE. DONATE. <3

simsgonewrong:

woohoo-juice-simoleons:

loobyloucreations:

loobyloucreations:

What Difference a chair would make.

Hi all, i am not the best of writers but i wanted to let you know a little bit more about how the campaign and money raising, would help and change my life. 

So in the picture is a picture of the type of chair i would like once the funds have been raised, this chair will be able to be used in my home and also out and about. This chair is also perfect as everything is also customisable so will be built specifically to my needs. This will be measured to my perfect fit and with customisation it also means if i am having a really bad with weakness in my arms then i can have dual controls so my husband will be able to use the gear stick to make the chair move too.

With this chair it would open up so many possibilities to me, things i took for granted before i became disabled.

The main thing would be that i would not have bruises all over my legs from the chair, currently now when i go out in my chair i have even a 10 minute outing leaves the sides of my thighs covered in black and blue bruises. 

I would be able to do longer outings such as go to look at shops in the town centre, go on day trips when invited by my parents something i currently have to say no too. I love visiting stately homes, going to places such as Matlock and Bakewell, day trips to the sea side. I would even be able to go out to the local park to feed the squirrels and ducks, be able to take a trip to the library.

The independence it would bring would allow me to be involved with things again, without having to have people being worried to rush if i am in pain, or leaving early because things are too painful for me.

All the little things gathered mean so much to me and would make such a huge impact on my life.

I want to thank everyone that has made a creation for the campaign, has re-blogged it, has made a donation, who has contacted me and you are all amazing and i am making some amazing friends along the way too 

Thank you 

<3 Hayley

If you would like to help by either sharing the campaign on facebook, or know someone who may want to make a donation please check newwheelchairforhayley

Thank you to all who have helped with my campaign, you are all truly amazing and thank you for sending me messages, it all means so much to me :) 

We went over £1600 this weekend and that is amazing, thank you all for your help :) 

There is still a way to go but i am having a great time with all this, you are making this such a positive experience 

OMG over 1600? Do you guys know how amazing this is! I’m so proud of this community. I should make something for y’all <3 Congrats, Hayley, we are that much closer to your new wheel chair.

READ THIS, REBLOG THIS, DONATE. DONATE. DONATE. <3

Reblogged from dogslug  17,546 notes

joewhyteillustration:

After spending months studying art and being inspired by my fellow students, i decided to animate the whole class’ figure studies into a series of animations. I found it really interesting looking at the different approaches we all took to our colour studies, yet how well they fit together as a whole.

Reblogged from homuncu-lus  118,831 notes

soyrwoo:

dajo42:

reverse werewolves. wolves that turn into confused but excited humans every month at the full moon and run around doing weird human stuff until they wake up the next day in the middle of an office with a suit loosely draped over their wolf form

"hey, jen, did you finish those taxes?"

image

"uh… jen…?"

Reblogged from exploding-pens  20,760 notes
letterstomycountry:

Via A Mighty Girl:

Professional hacker Parisa Tabriz is responsible for keeping the nearly billion users of Google Chrome safe by finding vulnerabilities in their system before malicious hackers do. Tabriz, a “white hat” hacker who calls herself Google’s “Security Princess”, is head of the company’s information security engineering team. The 31-year-old Polish-Iranian-American is also an anomaly in Silicon Valley according to a recent profile in The Telegraph: “Not only is she a woman – a gender hugely under-represented in the booming tech industry – but she is a boss heading up a mostly male team of 30 experts in the US and Europe.”Tabriz came up with “Security Princess” while at a conference and the unusual title is printed on her business card. “I knew I’d have to hand out my card and I thought Information Security Engineer sounded so boring,” she says. “Guys in the industry all take it so seriously, so security princess felt suitably whimsical.” Her curiosity, mischievousness, and innovative thinking are all assets in her business: a high-profile company like Google is constantly in the crosshairs of so-called “black hat” hackers.Tabriz came into internet security almost by accident; at the University of Illinois’ computer engineering program, her interest was first whetted by the story of early hacker John Draper, who became known as Captain Crunch in the 1960s after he learned how to make free long-distance calls using a toy whistle from a Cap’n Crunch cereal box. She realized that, to beat the hackers of today, she had to be prepared for similar — but more advanced — out-of-the-box thinking.While women at still very under-represented in the tech industry — Google recently reported that only 30% of its staff is female — Tabriz has hope for the future: “[F]ifty years ago there were similar percentages of women in medicine and law, now thankfully that’s shifted.” And, while she hasn’t encountered overt sexism at Google, when she was offered the position, at least one classmate said, “you know you only got it cos you’re a girl.” To help address this imbalance, she mentors under-16 students at a yearly computer science conference that teaches kids how to “hack for good” — and she especially encourages girls to pursue internet security work. One 16-year-old who attended, Trinity Nordstrom, says, “Parisa is a good role model, because of her I’d like to be a hacker.”Tabriz, who was named by Forbes as one of the “top 30 under 30 to watch” in 2012, also wants the public to realize that hacking can be used for positive ends. “[H]acking can be ugly,” she says. “The guy who published the private photos of those celebrities online made headlines everywhere. What he did was not only a violation of these women but it was criminal, and as a hacker I was very saddened by it. I feel like we, the hackers, need better PR to show we’re not all like that… [A]fter all I’m in the business of protecting people.”To read more about Google’s “Security Princess” in The Telegraph, visit http://bit.ly/Z6Z5RG

letterstomycountry:

Via A Mighty Girl:

Professional hacker Parisa Tabriz is responsible for keeping the nearly billion users of Google Chrome safe by finding vulnerabilities in their system before malicious hackers do. Tabriz, a “white hat” hacker who calls herself Google’s “Security Princess”, is head of the company’s information security engineering team. The 31-year-old Polish-Iranian-American is also an anomaly in Silicon Valley according to a recent profile in The Telegraph: “Not only is she a woman – a gender hugely under-represented in the booming tech industry – but she is a boss heading up a mostly male team of 30 experts in the US and Europe.”

Tabriz came up with “Security Princess” while at a conference and the unusual title is printed on her business card. “I knew I’d have to hand out my card and I thought Information Security Engineer sounded so boring,” she says. “Guys in the industry all take it so seriously, so security princess felt suitably whimsical.” Her curiosity, mischievousness, and innovative thinking are all assets in her business: a high-profile company like Google is constantly in the crosshairs of so-called “black hat” hackers.

Tabriz came into internet security almost by accident; at the University of Illinois’ computer engineering program, her interest was first whetted by the story of early hacker John Draper, who became known as Captain Crunch in the 1960s after he learned how to make free long-distance calls using a toy whistle from a Cap’n Crunch cereal box. She realized that, to beat the hackers of today, she had to be prepared for similar — but more advanced — out-of-the-box thinking.

While women at still very under-represented in the tech industry — Google recently reported that only 30% of its staff is female — Tabriz has hope for the future: “[F]ifty years ago there were similar percentages of women in medicine and law, now thankfully that’s shifted.” And, while she hasn’t encountered overt sexism at Google, when she was offered the position, at least one classmate said, “you know you only got it cos you’re a girl.” To help address this imbalance, she mentors under-16 students at a yearly computer science conference that teaches kids how to “hack for good” — and she especially encourages girls to pursue internet security work. One 16-year-old who attended, Trinity Nordstrom, says, “Parisa is a good role model, because of her I’d like to be a hacker.”

Tabriz, who was named by Forbes as one of the “top 30 under 30 to watch” in 2012, also wants the public to realize that hacking can be used for positive ends. “[H]acking can be ugly,” she says. “The guy who published the private photos of those celebrities online made headlines everywhere. What he did was not only a violation of these women but it was criminal, and as a hacker I was very saddened by it. I feel like we, the hackers, need better PR to show we’re not all like that… [A]fter all I’m in the business of protecting people.”

To read more about Google’s “Security Princess” in The Telegraph, visit http://bit.ly/Z6Z5RG